SCOTUS’ Decision On NC’s Voter Restrictions Was Too Close for Comfort

By | LXBN | September 2, 2016
Photo Credit: James Willamor cc

In a close Supreme Court decision the justices voted (4-to-4) against reinstating North Carolina’s identification requirement, meaning voters won’t have to show one of several qualifying photo IDs when casting ballots in the battleground state this November and early voting reverts to 17 days. With the decision coming so closely after the Fourth Circuit just struck down the voting laws, a question lingers in the air: What will it take for the conservative bloc on the high court to vote against voter ID laws?

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A Tale of Two Escobars: Federal Courts Begin Grappling with Opposing Views of “Materiality”

A Tale of Two Escobars: Federal Courts Begin Grappling with Opposing Views of “Materiality”

On June 16, 2016, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a highly anticipated opinion in Universal Health Services, Inc. v. U.S. ex rel. Escobar, which for the first time expressly recognized implied certification as a viable theory under the federal False Claims Act (FCA).

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SCOTUS to Consider City of Miami’s Predatory Lending Lawsuit Against Banks

By | Florida Banking Law Blog | August 25, 2016

In a case that will have a direct impact on creditors, the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear an appeal involving the City of Miami’s claims in three related cases that it suffered damages through alleged discriminatory lending practices of residential mortgage lenders including Bank of America, Wells Fargo, and Citigroup.

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Supreme Court Decision Restricts Government Prosecution of Political Corruption

In a unanimous 8-0 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court has vacated the political corruption convictions of former Virginia Governor Robert F. McDonnell for conspiracy to commit honest services fraud and Hobbs Act extortion and making false statements to federal officials. McDonnell v. United States, No. 15-474, 579 U.S. ___ (2016).

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Signed, Sealed, Delivered, but Not Dismissed: The Sixth Circuit Takes On Campbell-Ewald’s Offered Vs. Delivered Distinction

Signed, Sealed, Delivered, but Not Dismissed: The Sixth Circuit Takes On Campbell-Ewald’s Offered Vs. Delivered Distinction

Following the Supreme Court’s January decision in Campbell-Ewald Co. v. Gomez, 136 S. Ct. 663 (2016) that a defendant cannot moot a plaintiff’s individual claim by simply offering to satisfy the plaintiff’s demand before a motion for class certification is filed, but must instead deliver that relief, the lower courts have struggled to identify when relief has been delivered versus merely “offered.”

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