Supreme Court Enhances Creditor’s Right to Bar Debtor’s Discharge of Debts-Expanding Reach of Actual Fraud and Shareholder’s Liability

Supreme Court Enhances Creditor’s Right to Bar Debtor’s Discharge of Debts-Expanding Reach of Actual Fraud and Shareholder’s Liability

Until the recent U. S. Supreme Court’s decision in Husky International Electronics, Inc. v. Ritz, __ U.S. __, 136 S.Ct. 1581, 194 L.Ed.2d 655, 84 U.S. L.W. 4270 (2016),  there was disagreement in the circuit courts regarding whether a debtor in bankruptcy could be denied a discharge under 11 U.S.C. § 523(a)(2)(A) where the evidence of wrongdoing proved the debtor committed actual fraud, but there was no evidence that the debtor made a misrepresentation to the creditor seeking to bar the discharge. 

Tweet Like LinkedIn LinkedIn Google Plus

SCOTUS: No Quid Pro Quo Where Gov. Official Merely Arranged the Meeting, the Menu, the Venue, the Seating

SCOTUS: No Quid Pro Quo Where Gov. Official Merely Arranged the Meeting, the Menu, the Venue, the Seating

The hit Broadway musical Hamilton depicts a backroom dinner meeting between then Congressman James Madison (Virginia) and the titular Secretary of Treasury, during which Madison proposes a “quid pro quo”: Hamilton will convince President George Washington to move the nation’s capital to the Potomac in exchange for Madison providing the congressional votes needed to pass Hamilton’s debt plan.

Tweet Like LinkedIn LinkedIn Google Plus

SCOTUS Agrees to Review City of Miami Fair Housing Claim

SCOTUS Agrees to Review City of Miami Fair Housing Claim

The Supreme Court has agreed to review a discriminatory lending case brought by the City of Miami against Wells Fargo & Co. and Bank of America Corp. At issue is whether a city government is permitted to bring a suit seeking to enforce the equality guarantees of the Fair Housing Act.

Tweet Like LinkedIn LinkedIn Google Plus