“Guidance” That Does Not Guide: NLRB General Counsel Issues Interpretations of Common Employee Handbook Policies

“Guidance” That Does Not Guide: NLRB General Counsel Issues Interpretations of Common Employee Handbook Policies

We have not exactly been shy in expressing concern regarding many of the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) recent actions, nor hesitant to opine that its actions appear purposefully designed to advantage unions and create expansive new employee rights from the language of the 80-year-old National Labor Relations Act of 1935 (NLRA).

NLRB General Counsel Issues Guidance Memorandum On Employee Handbook Rules

NLRB General Counsel Issues Guidance Memorandum On Employee Handbook Rules

The General Counsel for the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) recently published a guidance memorandum that provides specific examples of lawful and unlawful employee handbook rules in the areas of confidentiality, professionalism and employee conduct, use of company logos, copyrights and trademarks, conflicts of interest, photography and recording, and interaction with the media and other third parties. 

NLRB Expands Scope of Union Representatives’ Permissible Conduct During Investigatory Interviews Under Weingarten

NLRB Expands Scope of Union Representatives’ Permissible Conduct During Investigatory Interviews Under Weingarten

In a 2-to-1 decision, a three-member panel of the National Labor Relations Board has held it was unlawful for an employer to threaten a union steward with suspension for showing an employee, during the employer’s investigative interview about a violation of company procedure, the steward’s answer to a question asked by the interviewer, which was written in the steward’s notebook, so that the employee could read it to the interviewer.

Say What? NLRB ALJ Finds Hospital’s English-Only Rule Unlawful

The latest office fodder for me and my colleague, Jason Usher (who formerly worked at the National Labor Relations Board (“Board”)), involves an Administrative Law Judge’s (“ALJ”) decision, Valley Health System LLC, that found that a healthcare employer’s English-only rule violated the National Labor Relations Act (“Act”).