Two New Rule Amendments Proposed by Commercial Division Advisory Council

If you have ever looked at a contract’s New York choice-of-law provision or a status conference stipulation and thought to yourself, “Who wrote this darned thing?” then now is your chance to weigh in. The Commercial Division Advisory Council has recommended two new forms—a model choice-of-law provision and a model status conference stipulation and order form—and the Office of Court Administration is soliciting public comments. View Full Post
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Paid Family Leave: Week 3 of Q&As

So here is Week 3 of Bond’s New York Paid Family Leave (“PFL”) Q&As.  This week we are focusing on which employers are and are not covered.  We also answer your questions about what certain exempt employers (i.e., those who are not required to have PFL coverage) must do in order to opt in for voluntary PFL coverage.  View Full Post
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Many, Many Years Later, the Judiciary Law 487 Claim is Lost at Trial

Judiciary Law § 487 claims do not generally get to a jury.  In Dupree v Voorhees  2017 NY Slip Op 06062  Decided on August 9, 2017  Appellate Division, Second Department a 12 year old case, which long ago raised new issues in Judiciary Law § 487 ended with a non-jury verdict. View Full Post
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And the Award for Most Oppressive Conduct by a Majority Shareholder Goes to . . .

By | New York Business Divorce | August 14, 2017
Over the years I’ve litigated and observed countless cases of alleged oppression of minority shareholders by the majority. Oppression can take endlessly different forms, some more crude than others in their execution, some more draconian than others in their effect. If there was an award for the crudest and most draconian case of shareholder oppression, Matter of Twin Bay Village, Inc., 2017 NY Slip Op 06024 [3d Dept Aug. View Full Post
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