Is Genesis Really a New Beginning for Rule 68 Offers of Judgment in FLSA Matters?

By | Employment Law Post | July 22, 2013

When the Supreme Court recently decided Genesis Healthcare Corp. v. Symczyk, 11-1059 (U.S. Apr. 16, 2013) employment attorneys across the country immediately jumped to the conclusion that they had the Court’s stamp of approval to use Rule 68 offers of judgment to foreclose individual and collective actions under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”).

The Undeniable Fact of a Pro-Big-Business Supreme Court

Three years ago, Professor Richard Epstein of the University of Chicago was peddling falsehoods and misconceptions about malpractice law that wouldn’t pass a 1L Torts class. Via Walter Olson, I see he’s back with a piece titled, “The Myth of a Pro-Business SCOTUS,” claiming “Commentators inaccurately condemn the five conservative justices as corporate shills.”

The Worst Supreme Court Cases of 2013 for Consumers, Employees, and Patients

Back in January 2012, I posted a short item titled, Supreme Court Sets The Tone For 2012 Term: Might Makes Right, in which I recounted how the Supreme Court had begun the 2011-2012 term with two opinions that were great if you own a prison management company or fake credit repair company, but not so great if you were injured by a private prison’s malfeasance or defrauded by a consumer credit company.

Supreme Court Rules That FLSA Collective Actions Are Distinct from Rule 23 Class Actions, but Fails to Resolve Circuit Split On Effect of Unaccepted Offers of Judgment

On April 16, 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Genesis Healthcare Corp. v. Symczyk, that a plaintiff-employee’s Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) collective action could not proceed because her claims were moot after the defendant offered the plaintiff, per Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 68, full relief for her individual claims.

U.S. Supreme Court OKs "Strategic" Settlement Offers in FLSA Cases

U.S. Supreme Court OKs "Strategic" Settlement Offers in FLSA Cases

In Genesis Healthcare Corp. v. Symczyk, just decided on April 16, 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court held that, in a Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) case, an early settlement offer to an employee which moots his or her individual FLSA claim will preclude the employee from continuing with a larger collective action on behalf of other employees.

Supreme Court Holds Employer’s Settlement Offer Can "Short Circuit" FLSA Lawsuit

Supreme Court Holds Employer’s Settlement Offer Can "Short Circuit" FLSA Lawsuit

In Genesis HealthCare Corp. v. Symczyk, No. 11-1059 (April 16, 2013), the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that an employee could not continue pursuing her Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) collective action after her employer made an “offer of judgment” (a type of settlement offer) that would pay her entire claim.