Let’s (Not) Make a Deal

By | NJ Family Legal Blog | February 23, 2017
While we do not typically blog on cases outside of the family court, a recent law division case examined the child support lien statute, N.J.S.A. 2A:56.23b and its impact on settling a personal injury case and on settlements in general.  The statute requires that a child support judgment search be performed to determine if a plaintiff in a given lawsuit has an outstanding child support obligation.   View Full Post
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Cat Burglar Receives Eight Year Prison Sentence for Art Heist in Paris

By | Art Law | February 22, 2017
In recent art world news, a cat burglar was sentenced to eight years in prison by a criminal court in Paris for stealing five masterpieces from the Paris Museum of Modern Art.  The burglar admitted that he had stolen five paintings worth over 104 million euros (about $110 million) during a predawn break-in at the museum back in May 2010.  View Full Post
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Commission Sales Representatives Seek Conditional Certification in FLSA Collective Action: Is There a Defense?

A group of sales representatives for a car dealership have requested conditional certification in a Fair Labor Standards Act case.  The employees allege that they were paid less than minimum wage and were not properly paid their commissions.  The case is entitled Hotaranu et al. v. View Full Post
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Fail to Comply with Discovery at Your Own Risk

30807004-alimony-word-in-white-3d-letters-on-a-ball-or-sphere-of-money-to-illustrate-financial-spousal-suppor[1]The recent decision in the case captioned R.S. v. W.E., Del Fam. Ct., No. CN10-05981, Kerr, J. (Jan. 4, 2017), warns Family Court litigants that failure to comply with discovery can have consequences. In this case, R.S. (“Wife”) was seeking (among other things) alimony. Leading up to the hearing date her ex-husband, W.E. View Full Post
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$2.3 Million Victory

I tried an eminent domain case last week in Bucks County, PA. The condemnor – the PA Turnpike Commission – alleged the property was worth $850,000. We alleged on behalf of the property owner that the property was worth $2.3 million. The jury deliberated for 3 hours and came back with a verdict of our exact amount – $2.3 million. View Full Post
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Chief Judge Stark Grants Defendants’ Motion for Summary Judgment of Patent Ineligibility

Chief Judge Stark Grants Defendants’ Motion for Summary Judgment of Patent Ineligibility By Memorandum Opinion entered by The Honorable Leonard P. Stark in Intellectual Ventures I LLC et al. v. Symantec Corp. et al., C.A. No. 13-440-LPS (D.Del. February 13, 2017), the Court granted Defendants’ motion for summary judgment of patent ineligibility upon finding that the claims at issue – claims 25 and 33 of U.S. View Full Post
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The Custody Case Where Everything Went Wrong.

By | Pennsylvania Family Law | February 17, 2017
The Custody Case Where Everything Went Wrong. Last Fall brought us a decision from the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania holding that a grandparent did not have standing to terminate a Father’s parental rights incident to an adoption. Last week brought us a Superior Court case in which the appeal comes from a Mother and her own Father in a custody case involving a 12-year-old child. View Full Post
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Catching Up with Fair Housing Defense Blog Reader Questions

By | Fair Housing Defense | February 17, 2017
Catching Up with Fair Housing Defense Blog Reader Questions I am always gratified to receive comments from Fair Housing Defense blog readers. Many enjoy the light and breezy writing style involving what could be, shall we say, a dry topic. Some, however, are a little less kind – one reader last week thought I didn’t know what I was talking about, and used a colorful metaphor. View Full Post
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Texas Dives into the Toilet Controversy

Texas Dives into the Toilet Controversy Back in 2015 Houston, Texas attempted to and failed to pass an expanded human equal rights ordinance (“HERO”) which would have made it illegal to discriminate against someone based on 15 different “protected characteristics,” including sex, race, religion, sexual orientation and gender identity. Now, the State of Texas has thought it prudent to follow the lead of North Carolina and pass a state wide law restricting bathroom access. View Full Post
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