FMLA Stands for “Family and Medical Leave Avalanche”

FMLA Stands for “Family and Medical Leave Avalanche”

We noted last year that 20 years after the original passage of the Family and Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”), the Department of Labor issued a survey report lauding the effectiveness of the law and the positive impact it has had on the American workforce. One of the most interesting points from that survey report was the assertion that most employers purportedly reported experiencing “little to no negative impact from the FMLA,” which caused at least this author to wonder what employers the DOL surveyed, particularly when the perception among many is that the FMLA has become a source of regular employee abuse.

Employers Must Make Sure They Have Evidence of Employee’s Receipt of FMLA Notices

By | Employment Law Alert | August 14, 2014
Employers Must Make Sure They Have Evidence of Employee’s Receipt of FMLA Notices

In a recent case decided by the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, Lupyan v. Corinthian Colleges Inc., an employee who did not return to work until after her 12 weeks of leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) had expired was able to avoid summary judgment against her because her employer was unable to come up with any hard evidence that she had actually received the FMLA notices mailed to her while on leave.