Court Orders EEOC to Pay Defendants’ Attorney’s Fees for “Baseless, Unreasonable and Frivolous” Lawsuit

Court Orders EEOC to Pay Defendants’ Attorney’s Fees for “Baseless, Unreasonable and Frivolous” Lawsuit

On March 18, 2015, in EEOC v. Global Horizons, Inc., et al., Case No. 2:11-CV-03045, Judge Edward F. Shea of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Washington ordered the EEOC to pay defendants Green Acre Farms, Inc. and Valley Fruit Orchards, LLC (collectively “Grower Defendants”) their reasonable attorney’s fees and costs incurred in defending against the EEOC’s meritless lawsuit.

EEOC Has Defined “ability to Interact with Others” As a Major Life Activity, Making Social Anxiety Disorder a Disability Under the ADA

By | Employment Law Matters | March 23, 2015
EEOC Has Defined “ability to Interact with Others” As a Major Life Activity, Making Social Anxiety Disorder a Disability Under the ADA

An employee fired after asking to be reassigned to a role with less direct personal interaction as an accommodation for her “social anxiety disorder” is being allowed by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to take her case to a jury. Jacobs v. N.C. Administrative Office of the Courts, 4th Circ., No. 13-2212, March 12, 2015.

“Lies, D*mned Lies, and Statistics”: Fourth Circuit Affirms Summary Judgment Against EEOC On Background Check Lawsuit Based Upon Faulty Statistical Analysis

“Lies, D*mned Lies, and Statistics”: Fourth Circuit Affirms Summary Judgment Against EEOC On Background Check Lawsuit Based Upon Faulty Statistical Analysis

We’ve written before on the questionable statistics used by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in other cases, and a recent court of appeals case involving background checks suggests that the EEOC is continuing to use such methods despite scathing criticism from courts.

Virginia District Court Rules That EEOC Cannot Issue Early Right-to-Sue Notice

Virginia District Court Rules That EEOC Cannot Issue Early Right-to-Sue Notice

On February 24, 2015, the District Court for the Western District of Virginia dismissed a pregnancy discrimination lawsuit because the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) prematurely issued a “right-to-sue” notice, giving the plaintiff permission to file a lawsuit in court before she was allowed to do so under the law.