What Are Canada’s Tariff Codes (As at July 14, 2017)?

Canada does not have a single customs duty or tariff rate for all imports. Over the years, Canada has entered into a number of free trade agreements.  A tariff rate code is assigned for every free trade agreement partner because tariff elimination commitments and tariff reduction schedules cause applicable tariff rates to be different from the MFN (most-favoured nation) tariff rate that Canada agreed to at the World Trade Organization.  View Full Post
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The July 12, 2017 Canada Gazette Contains Regulations Needed for Canada-Ukraine FTA and Canadian FTA Implementation

The July 12, 2017 issue of the Canada Gazette, Part II, is full of important trade-related regulations and orders.  In Canada, regulatory rules are published in the Canada Gazette.  Regulations are prepared by government departments and promulgated by the Governor in Council (Cabinet).  View Full Post
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The CFIA Reverses Its Decision: Wine Produced in the West Bank CAN Be Labelled “Product of Israel”

On July 13, 2017, early in the morning, we posted an article entitled “The Canadian Food Inspection Agency Asks For Israeli Wines To Be Removed From Ontario Shelves“.  We are pleased to confirm that the CFIA has reversed its decision that wines produced from grapes grown in the West Bank and fermented and produced in the West Bank should not be labelled “Produced in Israel”.  View Full Post
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Ontario Court of Appeal Affirms Aggregate Damages Appropriate

By Sara Albert and Simran Choongh Sara AlbertSimran Choongh The Ontario Court of Appeal has recently released two related decisions: Trillium Motor World Ltd. v Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP, 2017 ONCA 544 (“Cassels Decision”) and Trillium Motor World Ltd. v General Motors of Canada Limited, 2017 ONCA 545 (“GM Decision”). View Full Post
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Canada’s New Governor General is a Stellar Choice

Today, Prime Minister Trudeau will announce that Julie Payette will be named as Canada’s next Governor General. She is a stellar choice because she is a woman.  She is a stellar choice because she is from Quebec (since the last Governor General, David Johnson is from Ontario, tradition has it that the next Governor General should be a francophone).   View Full Post
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The Canadian Food Inspection Agency Asks for Israeli Wines to Be Removed from Ontario Shelves

On July 11, 2017, the Liquor Control Board of Ontario issued a letter to vendors, which revealed an astonishing decision by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (“CFIA”).  The CFIA took the position that wine produced from grapes that are grown, fermented, processed and blended in the West Bank cannot be labelled “Made in Israel” as that is “misleading”.   View Full Post
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Who Are the Principals of Class Counsel?

By Paul Blanchard Paul Blanchard In a class action, diverging opinions between a class representative and his lawyer can lead to delicate situations, especially when the outcome of the proceeding is at stake. In the recent case of Lépine c. Société canadienne des postes,[1] the Quebec Superior Court had to rule on an application to approve a settlement transaction filed by class counsel, supported by the defendant, but forcefully contested by the class representative. View Full Post
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The Antidumping Wiggle!

By | Canada-U.S. Blog | July 11, 2017
Originally published by the Journal of Commerce, July 2017 No, this is not the latest Internet craze, but rather evidence of just how persistently Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is enforcing antidumping evasion in the U.S.  It has been routine for CBP to send Requests for Information  to importers seeking production records establishing the individual shipment is actually made at the factory listed as the manufacturer.  View Full Post
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Canada’s Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act Has Sharp Teeth and Long Arms

Ontario’s highest court, the Ontario Court of Appeal, issued a decision on July 6, 2017 in R. v. Karigar, which takes enforcement of foreign bribery to another level in Canada.  In 2013, Mr. Karigar was convicted of offering to bribe a foreign public official contrary to paragraph 3(1)(b) of the Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act (“CFPOA”).  View Full Post
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