California Proposes New Permitting Procedures for Impacts to Wetlands and Waters of the State

On July 21, 2017, the California State Water Resources Control Board (State Board) published its latest proposal for new permitting procedures that would apply to waters of the State, including wetlands. The proposal – which would define wetlands, create delineation procedures, and impose requirements for an alternatives analysis and mitigation – will be vetted through workshops and a public hearing, with the public comment period ending September 7, 2017. View Full Post
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Abbott & Kindermann, Inc. is Pleased to Announce That Two of Its Attorneys Have Been Chosen for the 2017 Northern California Super Lawyers List

Diane G. Kindermann (2015-2017) and William W. Abbott (2004-2017) were again selected for the Northern California Super Lawyers List in the practice areas of Land Use and Zoning law. More information is available at http://www.superlawyers.com/california-northern/. The firm is pleased to continue to serve private and public clients in Northern California on land use, environmental and real estate matters for more than 20 years. View Full Post
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Pennsylvania Mechanics’ Lien Law and the Construction Notices Directory- Avoiding Potential Pitfalls

By | In the Zone | July 24, 2017
On October 14, 2014, the Pennsylvania General Assembly signed Act 142 creating the Pennsylvania State Construction Notices Directory, which became effective January 1, 2017 (the “Act”). The Act created an online directory whereby project owners or their agents (collectively, “Owner”) can register on an online, searchable state-wide database (the “Directory”) before beginning any construction project that costs over $1.5 million, by filing a Notice of Commencement in the Directory. View Full Post
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Venue Returned to County Where Failure to Communicate Medical Test Results Occurred

In Pennsylvania, a medical malpractice lawsuit must be filed in the county where the alleged malpractice occurred. The Superior Court in Pennsylvania recently reversed a trial court decision in a medical malpractice case that transferred venue from Philadelphia County to Berks County, sending the case back to Philadelphia County. View Full Post
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Mechanical & Service Contractors Association: Killer Contract Clauses for Construction & Service

By | Construction Law Now | July 24, 2017
On July 26th join Cohen Seglias attorneys Matt Gioffre and Dan Fierstein for their seminar, “Killer Contract Clauses for Construction & Service” for the Mechanical & Service Contractors Association (M&SCA) in Blue Bell, PA. Matt and Dan will explain Killer Contract Clauses, how courts will interpret and enforce them, and will provide best practice tips for managing a project to minimize the impact of these contractual provisions. View Full Post
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KY Contractors Can Now Assert Claims for Negligent Misrepresentation Against an Architect Despite Absence of a Contract

Design professionals doing business in Kentucky beware: the Kentucky Court of Appeals recently held that a contractor may pursue a negligent misrepresentation claim against an architect for delays to a project resulting from allegedly defective plans and specifications. The Court permitted the contractor’s tort claim despite the absence of a contractual agreement between the parties and the fact that the contractor signed documents that waived its claims.  View Full Post
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Inverse Condemnation – a Valuable Tool

Inverse condemnation is valuable tool for property owners and associations and can be relevant and useful in many situations. State and local governments and their agencies appear to operate with absolute immunity leaving property owners with no recourse when private property is damaged by a government entity. While it is true that a government entity is generally free from liability for its negligent actions, the doctrine of inverse condemnation is a little known remedy available to property owners when their private property is damaged. This doctrine of inverse condemnation originates in Article I, Section II of the Virginia State Constitution. Under this doctrine, recovery is permitted when private property is taken or damaged for public use, thereby bestowing on the owner a right to sue for such amount as would have been awarded if the property had been condemned under the eminent domain statute. View Full Post
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Court of Appeals Reiterates “Modest” Burden for Regulating Adult Uses in People Theatres of N.Y. Inc. V. City of New York

In People Theatres of N.Y. Inc. v. City of New York, 2017 N.Y. Slip Op. 04385, various owners of adult businesses (“Plaintiffs”) brought separate actions against the City of New York (“City”) based upon First Amendment challenges seeking relief against zoning ordinances that bar adult establishments from operating in, among other areas, all residential districts and most commercial and manufacturing districts (“Ordinance“). View Full Post
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