U.S. Supreme Court Says Police Need Search Warrant to Search Cell Phones

U.S. Supreme Court Says Police Need Search Warrant to Search Cell Phones

On June 25, 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously in the case of Riley v. California, 573 U.S. ________ (2014), that police may not generally search the cell phones of people they arrest without first getting search warrants. Should the police confront an authentic “now or never” situation, Chief Justice Roberts wrote, they may be entitled to search the cell phone if “exigent circumstances” exist.

LXBN TV: Supreme Court Makes the Right Call in Deeming Warrantless Cell Phone Searches Unconstitutional

By | LXBN | July 3, 2014
LXBN TV

Recently, the Supreme Court justices have taken quite a beating when it comes to their technical aptitude. “How can they be expected to weight issues at the bleeding edge of law and technology,” it’s been asked, “when they don’t even understand the basics of how some stuff works?” Well, some of the justices may or not may know how to use a smartphone, but they made the right decision in a key ruling on them.

Hobby Lobby, HIPAA and Happy Independence Day

Hobby Lobby, HIPAA and Happy Independence Day

The recent United States Supreme Court decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. has  attorneys, pundits, policy-makers and businesses (yes, corporations are people, too) pondering big, quintessentially American issues like the free exercise of religion, compelling government interests, and our fundamental right to make money (and, as a corollary issue, what distinguishes for-profit from not-for-profit corporations).