ALERT: Google’s Plan to Open Its Services to Children Could Promulgate Changes to COPPA Enforcement

By | InfoLawGroup | August 28, 2014
ALERT: Google’s Plan to Open Its Services to Children Could Promulgate Changes to COPPA Enforcement

Recent reports indicate that Google is developing a program that would allow children under the age of 13 to obtain accounts on Google services such as Gmail and YouTube.  The Wall Street Journal  recently reported that “Google is trying to establish a new system that lets parents set up accounts for their kids, control how they use Google services and what information is collected about their offspring… Google wants to make the process easier and compliant with the rules.”  These accounts would allow children under the age of 13 to create their own Gmail accounts and access child-friendly YouTube channels.

Social Media: What Happens to Your Account When You Die?

Will you instruct your executor to memorialise or close your Facebook account or will you sign up to DeadSocial to post goodbye messages posthumously? The US government has created guidelines for dealing with your digital afterlife. It also provides a template social media will. The US government’s first guideline is to read the terms and privacy policies of the various social media websites. Let us break it down for you…

New Data Disposal Law in Delaware Requires Action by Impacted Businesses

New Data Disposal Law in Delaware Requires Action by Impacted Businesses

While the federal government continues its inaction on data security bills pending in Congress, some U.S. states have been busy at work on this issue over the summer.  A new Delaware law H.B. 295, signed into law on July 1, 2014 and effective January 1, 2015, provides for a private right of action in which a court may order up to triple damages in the event a business improperly destroys personal identifying information at the end of its life cycle. 

NLRB Finds Employee’s Facebook “Like” and Comment Protected by Labor Law

By | Inside Privacy | August 27, 2014
By: mkhmarketing

Last Friday, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) ruled that two employees of a sports bar and restaurant were unlawfully discharged for their participation in a Facebook discussion criticizing their employer.  In the Facebook discussion that prompted the firings, a former employee complained in a status update that she owed more taxes than expected because of withholding mistakes by the employer…