Banking On Facebook — the View from Australia

By | Technology's Legal Edge | August 4, 2012

In the competitive world of personal finance banks are continuously looking for new ideas to gain a small commercial advantage over the competition.  Consequently, we have seen the introduction of internet banking and more recently the conduct of transactional banking on mobile phones.  Into this crowded arena the Commonwealth Bank of Australia announced this month its intention to launch a new service by the end of the year that will allow its customers to bank through Facebook.

Who’s Tweeting Live from Courtroom in the Apple V Samsung Trial?

By | Real Lawyers Have Blogs | August 3, 2012
Who’s Tweeting Live from Courtroom in the Apple V Samsung Trial?

The month-long Apple-Samsung Patent trial started a couple days ago and will continue for nearly a month. To get the live blow by blow directly from the courtroom follow theses reporters journalists live tweeting from the courtroom: Howard Mintz (@hmintz), legal affairs reporter at Mercury News in Silicon Valley is live blogging the trial and tweeting personally.

Don’t Do the Crime if You Can’t Hire a Body-Double to Do the Time

By | China Debate | August 3, 2012
Don’t Do the Crime if You Can’t Hire a Body-Double to Do the Time

If you were drafted during the U.S. Civil War, it was possible in some places to hire someone to go in your place. As far as I know that practice in America began and ended with the War Between The States. China may have taken this a step further, there has been a flurry of accusations that some wealthy criminals are hiring ‘body doubles’ to do their time for them.

Solicitor General Decides Not to File Petition for Review in United States V. Nosal: Circuit Split On Computer Fraud and Abuse Act Remains

By | Trading Secrets | August 3, 2012
Solicitor General Decides Not to File Petition for Review in United States V. Nosal: Circuit Split On Computer Fraud and Abuse Act Remains

The Solicitor General indicated yesterday that he will not file a petition for a writ of certiorari with the Supreme Court in U.S. v. Nosal. It was anticipated by some legal commentators that a Supreme Court decision in Nosal may resolve a deepening split between the Circuit Courts regarding the proper interpretation of the statutory language in the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA)

Responsible Corporate Officer Doctrine: Executives Who Allow Misdeeds Face Career-Ending Consequences—Eric Reed

By | LXBN | August 3, 2012
LXBN TV

In the battle against corporate crime, the Department of Justice is armed with a weapon unlike almost any we see in the corporate world: the Responsible Corporate Officer Doctrine allows not only for criminal prosecution for executives who allow misdeeds to happen on their watch—even if they’re not aware of them at all—but also potentially career-ending sanctions. To explain the Responsible Corporate Officer Doctrine and how it’s been applied recently, we bring in Fox Rothschild‘s Eric Reed, author on the Securities Compliance Sentinel.

What Happened to the Cybersecurity Bill?

By | Steptoe Cyberblog | August 3, 2012
What Happened to the Cybersecurity Bill?

The cybersecurity bill is dead for this Congress, with cloture failing by a vote of 52-46. The Senate’s failure to reach any kind of compromise is particularly striking, given that roughly two-thirds of the basic ideas in the bill had been endorsed by all of the following: the Obama administration, Senator McCain and the great majority of Senate Republicans, Majority Leader Reid, Senators Lieberman and Collins, as well as a bipartisan majority of the House.