Social Impact Bonds: Passing Fad or Revolutionary Innovation?

By | The Shriver Brief | October 16, 2012
Social Impact Bonds: Passing Fad or Revolutionary Innovation?

Imagine a conference room full of Wall Street types. Blackberries, hand-tailored suits, leather portfolios. Intermingled among the investment titans are public interest attorneys and social workers. After one of the Wall Street men stands in front of a whiteboard explaining how the bond market works, a social worker steps up and explains how a public social service program is administered.

How Your Employer Could Legally Hijack Your LinkedIn Account: LXBN Roundtable

By | LXBN | October 16, 2012

The intersection of social media and the law has proven to be an interesting one.  With Twitter being forced to hand over content posted on a protester’s account, a car salesmen losing his job over Facebook posts, and the NLRB invalidating social media policies left and right, it’s literally one case after another.  We can add yet another to the list, as the District Court for the District of Pennsylvania prepares today to hear Eagle v. Edcomm, a battle over the ownership of a LinkedIn account.

Anatomy of NFL Referees’ Lockout

By | Employment Matters Blog | October 16, 2012

Although some fans of the NFL may think it happened too late to save their team’s season, the membership of the NFL Referees Association is back at work after the National Football League and the union of its officials reached an agreement settling a three month labor dispute.

The Devil is in the Details: Federal Reserve Governor Daniel Tarullo Addresses Systemic Risk

By | The Corporate Observer | October 16, 2012

There has been a lot of discussion lately over whether or not our nations HUGE banking and financial institutions should be broken up. Current and former Wall Street insiders, scholars, regulators and a host of others have all offered their opinion – and over the past few months the tide seems to have been shifting in favor of breaking up the big banks.

More Judicial Activism by Federalist Society Members On the D.C. Circuit

One of the points I’ve made several times on this blog is that, for all the times liberal or progressive judges are accused of “judicial activism,” many “conservative” judges (usually members of the misleadingly-named The Federalist Society) are more than happy to ignore their own claimed principles of judicial restraint when it serves their purposes.