China: Cybersquatter Asks Chinese Court to Declare Its Own Domain Names Invalid

China: Cybersquatter Asks Chinese Court to Declare Its Own Domain Names Invalid The Beijing Haidian District People’s Court has recently heard a case in which a domain name registrant requested the court to declare its domain name registration contracts invalid. In this somewhat unusual case, the court granted this request concluding that the object of the agreement was cyber-squatting, thereby cancelling dozens of squatted domain names. View Full Post
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Vermont’s New Telemedicine Law Expands Insurance Coverage, Bans Recording

Vermont’s New Telemedicine Law Expands Insurance Coverage, Bans Recording Vermont health care providers and patients can now enjoy a revamped, and significantly improved, telehealth commercial insurance coverage law. Vermont Governor Phil Scott signed S. 50 into law on June 7, 2017, expanding commercial coverage and payment parity in the Green Mountain State by requiring Vermont Medicaid and private health plans to pay for telemedicine services at any patient originating site location rather than limiting coverage to services provided while the patient is located in a health care facility. View Full Post
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The Important First Step in Law Firm Client Succession

The Important First Step in Law Firm Client Succession Succession planning of client relationships at law firms requires a thoughtful examination of a law firm’s past, present and future.  Managing the transition of a senior lawyer’s practice to younger counterparts is not easy.  Poorly understood and executed, it can result in a loss of both valuable business and a cherished colleague.  View Full Post
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Who Has the Burden of Proof in a Canadian Customs Appeal?

Who Has the Burden of Proof in a Canadian Customs Appeal? On July 18, 2017, the Canadian International Trade Tribunal (the “Tribunal”) posted its decision in Schlumberger Canada Limited v. President of the Canada Border Services Agency (CITT Appeal No. AP-2015-022).  In this decision, the Tribunal opined on who has the burden of proof in tariff classification appeals. View Full Post
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Ten Significant Changes to Canada’s NOC Regulations

By | snIP/ITs | July 18, 2017
On July 15, 2017, the Canadian government published (link) its proposed amendments to the NOC Regulations. These amendments will implement sweeping changes to pharmaceutical patent litigation in Canada pursuant to obligations imposed under CETA. There will be a 15-day comment period, after which, the amendments will be published in final form. View Full Post
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Responsibility for German Nuclear Waste Shifts with Creation of State-owned Fund

By | Latham.London | July 18, 2017
Responsibility for German Nuclear Waste Shifts with Creation of State-owned Fund In early July 2017, operators of German nuclear power plants initiated the next step in the process of decommissioning by transferring €24 billion to the new state-owned fund for nuclear power plant waste disposal. The German state established the Fund for the Financing of the Nuclear Waste Disposal (Fonds zur Finanzierung der kerntechnischen Entsorgung) to transfer the nuclear waste management liabilities from the plant operators to the state. View Full Post
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Golden Rules: The Rule 40 Deadline is Nearing the (Slalom) Gate; Advertisers Cannot Just (Figure) Skate Over the Regulation

Golden Rules: The Rule 40 Deadline is Nearing the (Slalom) Gate; Advertisers Cannot Just (Figure) Skate Over the Regulation Summer may just be heating up, but advertisers should already be thinking about and planning for the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympic Games because the “Rule 40” deadline is fast approaching. The opening ceremony of the PyeongChang Olympics isn’t until February 9th of next year, but advertisers that are not official Team USA sponsors but want to include Team USA members in campaigns that run during the PyeongChang Olympics must act by August 1, 2017. View Full Post
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July 2017 FCC Meeting Recap: FCC Plans to Strengthen and Expand “Slamming” and “Cramming” Rules

July 2017 FCC Meeting Recap:  FCC Plans to Strengthen and Expand “Slamming” and “Cramming” Rules At its July 2017 Open Meeting, the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) adopted a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (“NPRM”) designed to strengthen and expand consumer protections against “slamming” and “cramming.” Slamming is the unauthorized change of a consumer’s preferred service provider, while cramming is the placement of unauthorized charges on a consumer’s telephone bill.  View Full Post
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Quoted in Corporate Counsel: Lessons from Hobby Lobby’s Settlement

Quoted in Corporate Counsel: Lessons from Hobby Lobby’s Settlement Earlier this month, nationwide arts-and-crafts retailer Hobby Lobby settled with U.S. Department of Justice over allegations of smuggling cultural artifacts from Iraq.  As part of the settlement, Hobby Lobby consented to forfeiture of the artifacts and payment of $3 million.  Hobby Lobby also agreed to adopt internal policies and procedures governing its importation and purchase of cultural property and must submit quarterly reports to the government on any cultural property acquisitions for the next eighteen months. View Full Post
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