New Developments in Insurance Broker Liability

We had a broker liability case not long ago involving a manufacturing facility on the banks of the Hudson River that got wiped out by Sandy.  The client had no flood coverage.  We argued that, under the particular circumstances of the case, the broker had an obligation to price the market for flood coverage, and to advise the client of available limits.  View Full Post
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Supreme Court to Review Whether Dodd-Frank Anti-Retaliation Provisions Protect Internal Whistleblowers

By | The D&O Diary | June 28, 2017
In the flurry of opinions and orders on Monday on the final day of the U.S. Supreme Court’s term, and amid the hubbub over the Court’s action on the Trump administration travel ban order, you might well have overlooked the fact that on Monday the Court also agreed to take up the question of whether or not the Dodd-Frank Act’s anti-retaliation provisions apply to and protect individuals who did not make a whistleblower report to the SEC. View Full Post
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SEC Disgorgement Constitutes a Penalty – How Far Will the Argument Go?

By | C-Suite Risk Report | June 28, 2017
On June 5, 2017, Justice Sotomayor delivered the unanimous opinion in Kokesh v. SEC, 2017 U.S. LEXIS 3557 (June 5, 2017), holding that disgorgement collected by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) constitutes a “penalty” under 28 U.S.C. §2462,[1] and thus subject to a five-year statute of limitations. View Full Post
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Draft Senate Health Bill Finally Revealed—Vote Could Take Place As Early Next Week

By | Global Insurance Blog | June 28, 2017
On June 22, 2017, Republican Senators released a “discussion draft” of the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA). The draft is the first public glimpse at the Senate version of the American Health Care Act bill, which narrowly passed the House this past May with the objective of repealing and replacing certain portions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). View Full Post
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Undefined Term in Business Insurance Policy Must Be Interpreted with Reference to Industry Specific Meaning to Satisfy Insured’s Reasonable Expectations

In an unpublished decision, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals recently used extrinsic evidence to interpret the meaning of “direct supplier” in the context of a commercial property loss.1 I previously blogged about this case in 9th Circuit to Interpret Meaning of “Direct Supplier” In Context of a Commercial Property Loss Claim. View Full Post
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There May Be Coverage for the Defense and Settlement of FTC Claims

By | POLICYHOLDER PERSPECTIVE | June 27, 2017
image: Are you Covered?A number of companies have been sued by the FTC in recent years, alleging, for example, that the company made claims regarding the product or service without adequate substantiation. Many of these companies are small private companies with limited resources. These companies frequently have “Management Liability” or “Private D&O” coverage which may provide relief. View Full Post
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Forest Oil: Texas Supreme Court Rejects Exclusive Jurisdiction of the Texas Railroad Commission Over Oilfield Contamination Claims

By | Louisiana Law Blog | June 27, 2017
By Tyler Moore Kostal The Texas Supreme Court recently handed down a decision in Forest Oil Corp. v. El Rucio Land & Cattle Co., Inc., 14-0979, 2017 WL 1541086 (Tex. Apr. 28, 2017), that at first glance, is reminiscent of the landmark Louisiana legacy cases Corbello and Magnolia Coal. View Full Post
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Tenth Circuit Follows Majority of the Circuit Courts and Holds Plaintiff Bears the Burden of Proving Causation in ERISA Breach of Fiduciary Duty Cases

On June 5, 2017, in Pioneer Centres Holding Co. Employee Stock Ownership Plan & Trust v. Alerus Fin., N.A., Case No. 15-1227, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit held that the plaintiff bears the burden on each element of its breach of fiduciary duty claim under ERISA. View Full Post
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Sixth Circuit Rules That Insured-vs.-Insured Exclusion Bars Coverage for Liquidation Trustee’s Claim

A case decided last week by the Sixth Circuit illustrates the importance of seeking bankruptcy claim policy amendments when placing D&O coverage. Indian Harbor Ins. Co. v. Zucker (6th Cir. Jun. 20, 2017) involved the application of the insured-vs.-insured exclusion and specifically, whether the policy’s insured-vs.-insured exclusion precluded coverage for a claim brought by a company’s liquidating trust, to which the company’s claims had been assigned by the company as debtor-in-possession after the company filed for bankruptcy. View Full Post
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Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Whether State Courts Retain Jurisdiction for IPO Securities Suits

By | The D&O Diary | June 27, 2017
In a June 27, 2017 order (here), the United States Supreme Court granted the petition of Cyan, Inc. for a writ of certiorari to consider the question of whether or not state courts retain concurrent jurisdiction for liability lawsuits under the ’33 Act, or whether as a result of changes to the relevant statutes under the Securities Litigation Uniform Standards Act of 1998 (SLUSA), state courts lack subject matter jurisdiction over ’33 Act suits. View Full Post
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