Monday Morning Regulatory Review: WOTUS Dammed, but How Much?

Monday Morning Regulatory Review:  WOTUS Dammed, but How Much?

One highlight from the last week in regulatory practice overshadowed all else: confusion over fundamental administrative law and judicial review issues far beyond the confines of environmental law became evident in conflicting court decisions and the damming of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Army Corps of Engineers’ Clean Water Rule: Definition of Waters of the United States (WOTUS).

District Court Enjoins Federal Regulations Revising Scope of Clean Water Act Jurisdiction

District Court Enjoins Federal Regulations Revising Scope of Clean Water Act Jurisdiction

A federal judge, Ralph R. Erickson, in North Dakota today granted several states’ request for a preliminary injunction to halt implementation of the Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ new rulemaking redefining the scope of their jurisdiction under the Clean Water Act. 

EPA Proposes New Standards for Methane and VOC Emissions for Unregulated Equipment in Oil and Natural Gas Source Category

As part of the Obama administration’s recent aggressive pursuit of greenhouse gas emissions reductions under President Obama’s Climate Action Plan, EPA is proposing to amend new source performance standards (NSPS) to include standards for reducing methane emissions for the oil and natural gas source category under the Clean Air Act.

It’s All Good – New Jersey Judge Approves NJDEP’s Controversial $225 Million Settlement with ExxonMobil

It’s All Good – New Jersey Judge Approves NJDEP’s Controversial $225 Million Settlement with ExxonMobil

After months of controversy, public comments, response to public comments, motions to intervene, amicus briefs, oral arguments, editorials and a sustained flurry of activity in social media, the decision we have been waiting for is here – Judge Michael J. Hogan granted NJDEP’s motion to approve the consent judgement with ExxonMobil that settles out for $225 million the State’s original $8.9 billion claimed for natural resource damages.