EOC Scores Summary Judgment Win in Suit Over Abercrombie Not Accommodating Muslim Employee’s Head Scarf

By | EEOC Year-End Countdown | September 9, 2013
EOC Scores Summary Judgment Win in Suit Over Abercrombie Not Accommodating Muslim Employee’s Head Scarf

In an opinion issued on September 3, 2013, in EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch Stores, Inc., Case No. 11-CV-03162 (N.D. Cal. Sept. 3, 2013), Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California granted the EEOC’s motion for summary judgment, finding Abercrombie & Fitch failed to reasonably accommodate a Muslim employee who sought to wear a head scarf at work despite Abercrombie’s “Look” Policy.

New Jersey Restricts Employer Access to Employees’ Personal Online Accounts

By | Inside Privacy | September 7, 2013

New Jersey has enacted restrictions on the ability of employers to access employees’ social media accounts, becoming the twelfth state to enact such legislation. More than 30 state legislatures have considered bills on the topic in 2013, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Avoiding Pitfalls with Unpaid Internships

By | Duff on Hospitality Law | September 6, 2013
SummerInternship

As the school year begins again, it is a great time for hoteliers to think about their unpaid internship programs.  Unpaid internships can be great symbiotic relationships.College students or individuals trying out new fields are willing to work for free in exchange for real-life work experience and something to add to their resumes. However before accepting free labor, employers must be aware of the potential consequences of this relationship and take steps to ensure their internship program complies with the law.

Third Circuit Finds That Putative Class Representatives Could Not Challenge Decertification of an FLSA Collective Action Once They Dismissed Their Own Claims

By | Employment Class Action Blog | September 6, 2013
Third Circuit Finds That Putative Class Representatives Could Not Challenge Decertification of an FLSA Collective Action Once They Dismissed Their Own Claims

While the now familiar two-step process for determining certification of FLSA collective actions may have been introduced based on valid concerns, it is increasingly vexing for employers in cases where they have either done nothing wrong or in cases that even on inspection are unlikely to survive conditional certification.