Steve Augustino and J. Bradford Currier

Honesty is the Best Policy:  FCC Imposes $1.7 Million Fine for Submitting Misleading Information in Inmate Calling Services Deal Stressing the importance of receiving truthful and accurate information, the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) reached a $1.7 million settlement with inmate calling services provider Securus Technologies, Inc. and related entities (“Securus”) to resolve allegations that Securus submitted misleading information to the FCC in support of a pending transfer of control.  View Full Post
A notable trend under Chairman Pai’s leadership has become the FCC’s proactive willingness to modify its rules in light of recent natural disasters.  As discussed in our recent podcast, the FCC suspended or waived a number of regulatory requirements over the past few weeks for carriers affected by recent major weather events, including rules related to service outage reporting, number portability, Lifeline, and payment of regulatory feesView Full Post
FCC Proposes First-Ever Forfeiture Against Property Owners for Facilitating Pirate Radio Operations Continuing its assault on unlicensed broadcast operations, the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) issued a unanimous Notice of Apparent Liability for Forfeiture (“NAL”) at its September meeting proposing the statutory maximum fine of $144,344 against a pirate radio operator as well as the owners of the property housing the unlicensed station.  View Full Post
August 2017 FCC Meeting Recap:  FCC Rings Up Another Spoofing Robocaller, Proposing Over $82 Million in Fines As part of its August 2017 Open Meeting, the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) issued a Notice of Apparent Liability for Forfeiture (“NAL”) proposing over $82 million in fines against Philip Roesel and the insurance companies he operated for allegedly violating the Truth in Caller Act by altering the caller ID information (a/k/a “spoofing”) of more than 21 million robocalls in order to generate sales leads and avoid detection by authorities.  View Full Post
August 2017 FCC Meeting Recap:  FCC Adopts Challenge Process for Billions in Mobility Fund Phase II Support At its August 2017 Open Meeting, the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) unanimously adopted an Order on Reconsideration and Second Report and Order (“Order”) outlining a process to challenge the FCC’s determinations of which areas will receive financial support in the upcoming second phase of the Mobility Fund.  View Full Post
When Ajit Pai was a Commissioner, he was a frequent critic of the FCC’s enforcement practice.  Now that Chairman Pai has led the FCC for six months, his approach to enforcement is coming into better focus.  In this episode of Kelley Drye’s Full Spectrum podcast, Kelley Drye enforcement attorneys Steve Augustino and Brad Currier discuss what we know and what we’re yet to learn about Pai, the Enforcer. View Full Post
July 2017 FCC Meeting Recap:  FCC Plans to Strengthen and Expand “Slamming” and “Cramming” Rules At its July 2017 Open Meeting, the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) adopted a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (“NPRM”) designed to strengthen and expand consumer protections against “slamming” and “cramming.” Slamming is the unauthorized change of a consumer’s preferred service provider, while cramming is the placement of unauthorized charges on a consumer’s telephone bill.  View Full Post
FCC (Again) Takes to Bully Pulpit to Urge Network Reliability “Best Practices” to Combat Service Outages On July 12, 2017, the Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau (“Bureau”) of the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) issued a Public Notice encouraging communications service providers to implement certain “best practices” to avoid major service disruptions.  The Bureau’s recommendations come on the heels of recent major service outages caused by minor changes to service providers’ network management systems that knocked out 911 service.  View Full Post