Does the California Supreme Court Average More Questions to the Losing Side?

Yesterday, for post no. 1,000 we reviewed the academic literature on question-counting in oral arguments, and began comparing the past year, May 2016-May 2017, at the California and Illinois Supreme Courts.  Every researcher to date – including us in our study of the Illinois Supreme Court 2008-2016 – found that getting more questions than your opponent was generally a sign you were in trouble.  View Full Post
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Blog Post No. 1,000: Comparing Oral Argument in the California and Illinois Supreme Courts

Today marks the milestone of my 1,000th blog post since Appellate Strategist began publishing on February 23, 2010. I thought we’d do a first today: comparing the two Supreme Courts we study in the same post.  Specifically, since I’ve had the honor of appearing at both the California and Illinois Supreme Courts, I thought we’d compare the data for the past year in each court. View Full Post
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Post No. 999: What Could We Infer When Justice Theis Asked the First Question in Civil Cases?

Yesterday, we began our analysis of Justice Theis’ question patterns in civil cases.  Today, we continue our work on Justice Theis’ civil arguments since taking office in 2010. When voting in the majority of an affirmance, there’s a 32.88% chance that Justice Theis will ask the first question of appellants, but only a 15.07% chance that she’ll lead off against the appellees.  View Full Post
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Coming Next Week: My 1,000th Blog Post

Last week, I was looking at our archives, pulling up old research, and I stumbled onto this two-year old post – my 500th on Appellate Strategist. Now that our other two blogs, Illinois Supreme Court Review and California Supreme Court Review, have been publishing for a while, I decided to check the dashboards there too. View Full Post
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Coming Next Week: My 1,000th Blog Post

Last week, I was looking at our archives, pulling up old research, and I stumbled onto this two-year old post – my 500th on Appellate Strategist. Now that our other two blogs, Illinois Supreme Court Review and California Supreme Court Review, have been publishing for a while, I decided to check the dashboards there too. View Full Post
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Where Do the California Supreme Court’s Civil Cases Originate (Part 8)?

Today, we conclude our series on the originating jurisdictions, year-by-year, of the Court’s civil docket. In 2014, as usual, Los Angeles led, originating ten of the Court’s civil cases.  Two cases between in Alameda County and the United States District Court for the Central District of California.  View Full Post
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What Could We Infer When Chief Justice Fitzgerald Asked the First Question in Criminal Cases?

Yesterday, we reviewed the data for Chief Justice Fitzgerald’s question pattern in criminal cases between 2008 and 2010.  Today, we look at a different aspect of the data – was the Chief Justice more likely to ask the first question of either side, depending on how he was voting and whether he was writing an opinion? View Full Post
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