NJ Supreme Court Disapproves Class Certification In Landmark TCCWNA Case Today, the New Jersey Supreme Court drove a stake into the many class actions alleging claims under New Jersey’s Truth-in-Consumer Contract, Warranty and Notice Act (“TCCWNA”).  That law provides for $100 in damages whenever an “aggrieved consumer” demonstrates that a contract or other document contains provisions that violate any “clearly established legal right.”  The Supreme Court’s new decision construed both of those statutory limitations in a manner that should preclude virtually all the pending class action cases.  View Full Post
Yesterday, a panel of the Third Circuit Court of Appeals took another step back from a circuit split over the extent to which aspiring class plaintiffs must show a “reliable and administratively feasible means of determining whether putative class members fall within the class definition,” and one judge called for scrapping that requirement altogether. View Full Post
On Friday, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals’ decision in In re Petrobras Securities refused to adopt what it called a “’heightened’ two-part ascertainability test in class action cases.  The Second Circuit agreed that class action plaintiffs must show that ‘the class is defined with reference to objective criteria,’ but did not agree that plaintiffs also must put forward “a ‘reliable and administratively feasible mechanism for determining whether putative class members fall within the class definition.’”  The Third Circuit ostensibly has required both showings in class action cases, but the Second Circuit decided to “join a growing consensus that now includes the Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, and Ninth Circuits,” all of which expressly disagreed with their interpretations of the Third Circuit’s holdings. View Full Post