Violence and Attorneys–Time for a Wake-up Call?

By | State Bar of Texas Blog | August 28, 2014
Violence and Attorneys–Time for a Wake-up Call?

We usually don’t consider the practice of law to be a dangerous profession, nestled as we normally are behind desks. But as the articles in the upcoming September issue of the Texas Bar Journal illustrate, violence has a very real impact on the legal profession—from the legal implications of and reactions to mass shootings to the risks faced by attorneys working in areas like family law and criminal law.

Spotlight On San Francisco: New Proposals to Benefit Part-Time and Minimum-Wage Employees

Spotlight On San Francisco: New Proposals to Benefit Part-Time and Minimum-Wage Employees

Two proposed San Francisco ordinances could mean more hours and more money for San Francisco’s part-time and minimum-wage employees. San Francisco Supervisor Eric Mar’s recent proposal will give additional rights to part-time employees, including more hours, and a new ballot initiative for November proposes to raise the minimum wage rate in San Francisco.

Social Media: What Happens to Your Account When You Die?

Will you instruct your executor to memorialise or close your Facebook account or will you sign up to DeadSocial to post goodbye messages posthumously? The US government has created guidelines for dealing with your digital afterlife. It also provides a template social media will. The US government’s first guideline is to read the terms and privacy policies of the various social media websites. Let us break it down for you…

Rejection by the EEOC Means Nothing

Rejection by the EEOC Means Nothing

The EEOC received some 93,727 charges of discrimination last year. Locally, each EEOC investigator carries a case load of 75-95 cases per year. Those numbers indicate very little time is devoted to actual investigation. The open secret is that the EEOC conducts very few true investigations. Yet, many folks still think that when the EEOC rejects a case, that rejection means something.