Back to Basics: A Review of Recent SCOTUS Personal Jurisdiction Jurisprudence

Back to Basics: A Review of Recent SCOTUS Personal Jurisdiction Jurisprudence As its term drew to a close, the Supreme Court handed down its latest decision on personal jurisdiction in a case entitled Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. v. Superior Court of Cal., San Francisco Cty.[1]  Over the last six years, the Supreme Court has issued six opinions clarifying the limits of courts’ personal jurisdiction, each invalidating the exercise of jurisdiction.  View Full Post
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Today in Legal Artificial Intelligence

Today in Legal Artificial Intelligence AI should soon have a seat at the table regarding the business of law, not just the practice of law. As this article from the HBR explains, business strategy can become much more powerful through application of AI. “The processing power of four smart consultants with excel spreadsheets is minuscule in comparison to a single smart computer using AI running for an hour, based on continuous, non-stop machine learning, … AI can also bring greater clarity to annual budgeting processes, by tracking the return on investments by business unit, or by measuring how much is allocated to growing versus declining product lines.” View Full Post
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Refusal to Hire Medical Pot Users Just Got Riskier–at Least in Rhode Island

Refusal to Hire Medical Pot Users Just Got Riskier–at Least in Rhode Island Seyfarth Synopsis: On May 23, 2017, in Callaghan v. Darlington Fabrics Co., a Rhode Island Superior Court issued a unique decision regarding employer obligations to medical marijuana users.  The Judge who penned the decision began his analysis by quoting a 1967 lyric from The Beatles’ song “With A Little Help From My Friends”: “I get high with a little help from my friends.”  In the 32-page opinion followed this witty opening, the Court held that an employer’s refusal to hire an individual based on her medical marijuana use violated Rhode Island’s medical marijuana statute, and the employer’s conduct may have amounted to disability discrimination under the Rhode Island Civil Rights Act (“RICRA”). View Full Post
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It’s As Suggestive As a Butter Knife for Steak

By | DuetsBlog | July 25, 2017
It’s As Suggestive As a Butter Knife for Steak We’ve written quite a bit over the years about the Spectrum of Distinctiveness for trademarks, and the all-important difference between suggestive marks and merely descriptive ones, with only the former being allowed immediate rights based on first use. Creativity is what separates the power of suggestion from the weakness and limbo of descriptiveness. View Full Post
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Tennessee District Court: Dodd-Frank is Not a General Anti-Retaliation Law

Tennessee District Court:  Dodd-Frank is Not a General Anti-Retaliation Law The United States District Court for the Western District of Tennessee recently emphasized the limited scope of what constitutes protected activity under the Dodd-Frank Act’s (the Act) whistleblower protection provision, noting that the Act protects only “certain kinds of whistleblowers who report certain kinds of violations.”  Boyle v. View Full Post
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How to Catch Trade Secret Thieves Who Try to Cover Their Tracks: A Forensic Perspective

How to Catch Trade Secret Thieves Who Try to Cover Their Tracks: A Forensic Perspective As a special feature of our blog—special guest postings by experts, clients, and other professionals—please enjoy this blog entry from Jonathan Karchmer, a senior managing consultant at iDiscovery Solutions with experience in managing projects dealing with computer forensic examination and experience advising counsel regarding intellectual property and trade secret theft.  View Full Post
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Nevada Enacts Online Privacy Policy Law; Illinois ‘Right to Know’ Bill Dies

Nevada Enacts Online Privacy Policy Law; Illinois ‘Right to Know’ Bill Dies Effective July 1, 2017, Nevada joined California as the second state to require operators of websites and online services to post a public notice regarding their privacy practices. Like California’s law, the new Nevada legislation specifies that the posted notice must meet the following requirements: Identify the categories of personally identifiable information (PII) collected through the site (Nevada’s definition of covered PII tracks California’s almost identically). View Full Post
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